Thursday, May 7, 2009

Disruptive Innovation and Community

Since public schools in Vermont are essentially community-based organizations, if we disrupt them through innovation do we also disrupt our communities? Can we disrupt our educational system without disrupting our communities?

7 comments:

  1. If we start with small areas of non-consumption (what haven't we been able to do so far) I think we could disrupt through innovation without disrupting communities.

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  2. I would argue it is already happening. Communities are being built around parts of school that are not directly tied to education. For instance many of our sports teams are not connected to a school, but an area. Community youth dances our becoming the norm and churches are attracting people from various towns. Old gathering venues such as granges, Knights of C, Lions Club, etc or either gone or in desperate need of membership. Technology allows all kids to keep in constant touch. The idea of being isolated in a small town is gone. Our children are reaching out to like peers all over the US and look forward to leaving Vermont to explore. Many don't return. Our communities are being disrupted and the education sector is the last to realize it.

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  3. Disruption is happening in communities. When I think of communication tools, knowledge-sharing, continuous learning and global connections, our communities are participating in these disruptive trends. Members of small and large communities are accessing the latest innovations which match their "wired" minds and they are engaging in activities which are customizable to their personal needs and styles.

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  4. I would have to agree with the opinions of the others that our communities are already part of this disruption. We need to include them to keep our communities in sinc with the schools. I think that this is the way of the future that will allow us to provide more for our students in ways that they learn best. Vermont's history and culture are all about the individual so I don't think it will be a problem if everyone is included and feel like they have a say. You can't jam it down their throats. I'm excited about these ideas as it seems to fit so nicely with what we already do in Special Education.

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  5. The traditional organization of a public school in Vermont is geographic, with the school "at the heart of the community." Schools can become innovative and student-centric without distrupting their place in the community by transforming themselves into lifelong, 24/7 learning centers for all community members through the power of technology.

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  6. From the standpoint of a community member and not a professional educator, I believe our communities are ready for their schools to be disrupted, especially if it improves the learning and school experience of students.

    In discussing this book with another parent, I noted that the parent embraced the general ideas of this book (as summarized by me -- the parent has not read the book) but initially thought the word "disrupt" had negative connotations.

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  7. Our schools are very tied to their communities. If we are to disrupt our classrooms I would like to try to educate our communities as to the values of these new practices. Currently, Vermont communities have a majority of retirees which means that they went to school in the traditional classroom where technology was non-existent, or atleast, much different. I was reading an article that said that older people think that the younger people who take online courses are not connected to people and are just playing on the computer. We need to show or teach them of the value of the current technology. Afterall, we don't want to disrupt them (our communities) too much since they are the ones who approve and pay our budgets.

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